Ember Days

Before the revision of the Catholic Church’s liturgical calendar in 1969, the Church celebrated Ember Days four times each year.  They were tied to the changing of the seasons, but also to the liturgical cycles of the Church.

The spring Ember Days were the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after the First Sunday of Lent; the summer Ember Days were the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after Pentecost; the fall Ember Days were the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after the third Sunday in September (not, as is often said, after the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross); and the winter Ember Days were the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after the Feast of Saint Lucy (December 13).

The origin of the word “ember” in “Ember Days” is not obvious, not even to those who know Latin.  According to the Catholic Encyclopedia, “Ember” is a corruption (or we might say, a contraction) of the Latin phrase Quatuor Tempora, which simply means “four times,” since the Ember Days are celebrated four times per year.

The Ember Days are celebrated with fasting (no food between meals) and half-abstinence, meaning that meat is allowed at one meal per day.  (If you observe the traditional Friday abstinence from meat, then you would observe complete abstinence on an Ember Friday.)

With the revision of the liturgical calendar in 1969, the Vatican left the celebration of Ember Days up to the discretion of each national conference of bishops.  They’re still commonly celebrated in Europe, particularly in rural areas.

In the United States, the bishops’ conference has decided not to celebrate them, but individual Catholics can, and many traditional Catholics still do, because it’s a nice way to focus our minds on the changing of the liturgical seasons and the seasons of the year.  The Ember Days that fall during Lent and Advent are especially useful to remind children of the reasons for those seasons. (8:8)

Announcements for January 19-20, 2019

  1. The Adult Faith Committee invites you to join them for their next Bible Study, “Grace is God’s Gift to Us”. There is still room for you.  Please see the bulletin for more details.

 

  1. Would you like to learn more about the Benedictine spirituality for the laity? There will be an informational meeting on Sunday, January 27th.  Please see the bulletin for more details or contact Julia Schenk.

 

  1. Parishioner Joe Henkels will give a presentation on his pilgrimage experience to Medjugorje, Bosnia on Sunday, January 27 @ 7pm. All are invited to attend.  No registration is necessary.

 

  1. Join the Knights of Columbus next Sunday after both Masses for a delicious Scrambled egg and biscuits and gravy breakfast. All proceeds will go towards Gigi’s Playhouse.  See the insert in the bulletin this weekend for more information.

 

  1. Join us in the Gathering Space after Mass today for some light snacks hosted by the Marketing Committee of Assumption Parish.

Mass Intentions for January 21-27, 2019

Monday, January 21

8:00 am       Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

Tuesday, January 22

8:00 am       Mass, In Memory of The Abramovich Family

Wednesday, January 23

8:00 am       Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

Thursday, January 24

8:00 am       Mass, In Memory of Donna Rayhons

Friday, January 25

8:00 am       Mass, Special Intentions for an Individual

Saturday, January 26

5:00 pm       Mass, In Memory of Teresa Rilea

Sunday, January 27

8:00 am       Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

10:00 am     Mass, In Memory of Leon & Vivian Hosch

Announcements for January 12-13, 2019

  1. The Adult Faith Committee invites you to join them starting this week for their next Bible Study, “Grace is God’s Gift to Us” please see the bulletin for dates and times under the calendar.

 

  1. Save the date of Sunday, January 27 as Joe Henkels presents his pilgrimage to Medjugorje.

 

SATURDAY ONLY !!!!

Join the Catholic Women’s Club down in the gym right after

Mass tonight for a delicious homemade chicken noodle

dinner. 

Mass Intentions for January 14-20, 2019

Monday, January 14

8:00 am          Mass, Special Intentions for an Individual

Tuesday, January 15

8:00 am          Mass, In Memory of Phyllis Byrnes

Wednesday, January 16

8:00 am         Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

Thursday, January 17

8:00 am          Mass, In Memory of Brittany Kock

Friday, January 18

8:00 am          Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

Saturday, January 19

5:00 pm          Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

Sunday, January 20

8:00 am Mass, In Memory of Brittany Kock

10:00 am Mass, In Memory of Brenda Schram

 

Ordinary Time

Besides the times of the year that have their own distinctive character, there remains in the yearly cycle thirty-three or thirty-four weeks in which no particular aspect of the mystery of Christ is celebrated, but rather the mystery of Christ itself is honored in its fullness—the Church contemplates the entire mystery of salvation—especially on Sundays.  This period is known as Ordinary Time.

But “Ordinary” does not mean boring or ho-hum, but the word “ordinary” comes from the word “ordinal” which means counted (i.e. First Week of Ordinary Time, Second Sunday of Ordinary Time, etc.).

Ordinary Time then, is a period that is counted that doesn’t fall in Lent, Easter, Advent, etc.  Ordinary Time begins at the conclusion of the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, which is also the end of the Christmas Season.

Ordinary Time has two defined periods: the first period begins after the Baptism of the Lord and continues through the day before Ash Wednesday; and the second begins after Pentecost and continues to Evening Prayer on the Saturday before the First Sunday of Advent. (8:7)

Christmas Season

The liturgical season of Christmas begins with the vigil Masses on Christmas Eve and concludes on the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, which normally falls on the Sunday following the Epiphany, as it does this year.

The Feast of the Epiphany of Our Lord Jesus Christ is one of the oldest Christian feasts, though, throughout the centuries, it has celebrated a variety of things.  Epiphany comes from a Greek meaning “to reveal,” and all of the various events celebrated by the Feast of the Epiphany are revelations of Christ to humanity.

During the Christmas season, we celebrate the birth of Christ into our world and into our hearts, and reflect on the gift of salvation that is born with him.

Our celebration of Christmas does not end on December 26, rather Christmas season ends and the return to Ordinary Time occurs at the conclusion of the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, which is on January 13.  (8:6)

Announcements for January 5-6, 2019

  1. The Adult Faith Committee invites you to join them starting the week of January 14th for their next Bible Study, “Grace is God’s Gift to Us” please see the insert in the bulletin for more details.

 

  1. Looking for some volunteer opportunities?? Pick up a bulletin today as Bishop Drumm has some great opportunities!

 

  1. Save the date of Sunday, January 27 as Joe Henkels presents his pilgrimage to Medjugorje.

 

  1. Mark your calendars NOW for the upcoming Homemade Chicken Noodle Dinner on Saturday, January 12th hosted by our very own Catholic Women’s Club.

Mass Intentions January 7-13, 2019

Monday, January 7

8:00 am       Mass, In Memory of John Craggs

Tuesday, January 8

8:00 am       Mass, Special Intentions for an Individual

Wednesday, January 9

8:00 am       Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

Thursday, January 10

8:00 am       Mass, In Memory of John & Mary Ladurini

Friday, January 11

8:00 am       Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

Saturday, January 12

5:00 pm       Mass, In Memory of Phyllis Byrnes

Sunday, January 13

8:00 am       Mass, Deceased Members of Assumption Parish

10:00 am     Mass, In Memory of Fr. Jerry Burkert

Christ

The use of “Christ,” meaning “the anointed,” the “Messiah,” as a proper name became common after the death of our Lord, particularly in the writings of St. Paul.  It might be used either before or after the name “Jesus.”  Its use by St. Paul declared the Apostle’s belief and affirmation of the divinity of Jesus.

However, the word Kyrios in Greek is a translation of the Aramaic equivalent of “the prophesied king.”  Thus, Jesus fulfilled in His Incarnation the promise made to Abraham, as given in the genealogy found in the first chapter of St. Matthew’s Gospel.

Vatican II spoke of Christ:  “He who is the image of the invisible God is Himself the perfect man.  To the sons of Adam He restores the divine likeness which had been disfigured from the first sin onward.  Since human nature as He assumed it was not annulled, by the very fact it has been raised up to a divine dignity in our respect too.  For by His Incarnation the Son of God has united Himself in some fashion with every human.  He worked with human hands.  He thought with a human mind, acted by human choice, and loved with a human heart.  Born of the Virgin Mary, He has truly been made one of us, like us in all things except sin.”  (8:5)