Social Justice

The Catholic Church’s social teaching is a rich treasure of wisdom about building a just society and living lives of holiness amidst the challenges of modern society.  Modern Catholic social teaching has been articulated through a tradition of papal and episcopal documents.  The depth and richness of this tradition can be understood best through a direct reading of these documents.

The Catholic Church proclaims that human life is sacred and that the dignity of the human person is the foundation of a moral vision for society.  This belief is the foundation of all the principles of our social teaching. In our society, human life is under direct attack from abortion and euthanasia.  The value of human life is being threatened by cloning, embryonic stem cell research, and the use of the death penalty.

The person is not only sacred but also social.  How society is organized—in economics and politics, in law and policy—directly affects human dignity and the capacity of individuals to grow in community.  Marriage and the family are the central social institutions that must be supported and strengthened, not undermined.  We believe people have a right and a duty to participate in society, seeking together the common good and well-being of all, especially the poor and vulnerable.

The Catholic tradition teaches that human dignity can be protected and a healthy community can be achieved only if human rights are protected and responsibilities are met.  Therefore, every person has a fundamental right to life and a right to those things required for human decency.  Corresponding to these rights are duties and responsibilities to one another, to our families, and to the larger society. (6:9)